Superhero Fusion
Fine Arts, Sculpting
2011
sculpture
  •  
    PLANET RIETVELD- HOME AT LAST!
    Could have Superman saved the planet without a helping hand from the De Stijl art movement? 'The Red / Blue Chair' designed in 1917 by Gerrit Rietveld represents one of the first explorations of the De Stijl movement in three dimensions. The original design was in white, gray and black. Rietveld changed that, using primary colours, after coming in contact with the work of Piet Mondrian.
  •  
     
     
     
    GAGA FACES THE PAST
    Where would Lady Gaga be without the Bauhaus? Herbert Bayer's cover for the book 'Staatliches Bauhaus, Weimar, 1919-1923' employs dramatic block-like lettering in bright red and blue against a black background. He manipulated the spacing of the letters so that each of the four lines of text is the same length. As a result, the title appears as a unified block of text, rather than just individual words.
  •  
     
     
     
    NO PRIMARY COLOURS
    Is Pink the new Red? In 1923 Wassily Kandinsky circulated a questionnaire at the Bauhaus, asking respondents to fill in a triangle, square, and circle with the primary colors of red, yellow, and blue. He hoped to discover a universal correspondence concerning form and color, embodied in the equation red=square, yellow=triangle, blue=circle. 
  •  
     
     
     
    JOKER TAKES OVER LENIN'S TRIBUNE
    Is really 'the will to power' the driving force? In 1924, El Lissitzky (influenced by Tatlin's Monument to the 3rd International) designed a special tribune to enable Lenin, the leader of the world proletariat, to make public addresses. Lenin died before the project was realized. A photograph of him on the Tribune with his hand overstretched was glued later to Lissitzky's drawing.
  •  
     
     
     
    DOWN WITH ART. LONG LIVE AGITATIONAL PROPAGANDA!
    Gustav Klutsis made his 'Maquette for a Radio-announcer' in 1922. This was a design for a street-based loudspeaker to be placed at city intersections, to broadcast a speech by Lenin on the 5th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. As with other Russian constructivists, Klutsis sought to place art at the service of the new Socialist society and it's early ideals. He designed a series of -never realized- propaganda devices among which the piece named "Down with art. Long live agitational propaganda". Despite his active and loyal service to the Party, he was arrested in Moscow on January 17, 1938. His fate remained unknown until 1989 when it was discovered that he had been executed nearly six weeks after the arrest.
  •  

    SUPERHERO FUSION, 2011
    This series of mixed media maquette sculptures, attempts to establish a humorous conversation between early 20th century masters of art and design (that helped shape Modernity) and contemporay icons of Pop culture. It's all about interrelation and continuity. Materials used: cardboard, wood, acrylic colours, sand, sand paper, glitter, foamboard, laser print on paper, remodeled (1:50) figurines. Photography by Michalis Dalanikas & Dimitris Polychroniadis.